Our love of food is what sets us apart

On Monday of this week, while the weather was still sweet and warm and felt like summer, we had a dinner party at my Uncle Ed and Aunt Alice’s home in Bismarck. Now, while most folks would be bar-b-queuing up a storm this particular second day of summer in North Dakota (I’m not kidding, there was maybe only one other day in 2014 that reached temperatures of near 90-degress), we were treated to the most delicious, delightful, unexpected and awesome dinner of all time — Fleisch Kechla. Okay, so I don’t know exactly how to spell it, but its close enough. For those of you who do not know, or have never experienced this before…imagine a gently seasoned patty of good beef wrapped in a light and smooth pastry crust and then deep fried a golden brown. It was heavenly. While I have know what this pastry is my whole life, I have never eaten one so divine. There are no restaurants in the world to compete with this wonderful concoction that Ed and Alice spent the greater portion of their day creating just for nieces and their spouses.

Joe and Mary Vetter held a dinner party. It was a make your own sausage the way grandfather did party. Here Ed Kaseman is holding the casing while someone stuffs the meat and seasonings through a large funnel.

Joe and Mary Vetter held a dinner party. It was a make your own sausage the way grandfather did party. Here Ed Kaseman is holding the casing while someone stuffs the meat and seasonings through a large funnel.

Which brings me to the next dinner part that Ed and Alice attended. Not your ordinary sit down and eat feast. This was an experiment in culture. Only Germans from Russia would get together and chop meat and potatoes to make sausage like their forefathers did before the advent of electricity and/or grinders. Ed said in an email, “Last nite at Joe and Mary Vetter’s house, we made sausage the primitive way. The way it was made before crank stuffers were invented.  The sausage was delicious; and all the other goodies we had, an experience  I have long desired. The sausage was boiled in a turkey fryer and then fried.”

The ingredients were simple, diced potatoes, diced pork, salt, pepper and garlic.

In my research and interviews with Germans from Russia and inquiries to my family and scholars on the subject of our food culture, I have learned that food is what sets us apart from other ethnic groups in the state. We are all actively practicing the food culture of our ancestors – which might explain why some of us look like them still….

I hope you have a wonderful weekend of cuisine and fun no matter what your background. I am off to create some wonderful breads with ewiger saatz… not the book, but the everlasting yeast. Gute Essen.

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About spidersue

Working on books, working, gardening, baking, canning, knitting, crocheting, reading, walking, getting older, getting wiser, love my children, love love love my grandchildren.
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